In the 20th century, William Fuld’s name became synonymous with Ouija boards. We look at how William Fuld got into the Ouija game, the feud with his brother that split the family for nearly a century, his mysterious death that resulted from some advice that the board gave him, and more.

We also talk about how the official Ouija board evolved throughout the 20th century, look at some of his competitors, and talk about what he did to shut them down and make his Ouija board the Ouija board. 

We also give an update on the planchette that Chris ordered and had an unsettling experience trying for the first time, getting a message that may have a connection to the hostile entity we spoke to in Salem.

 

You can listen to more audio on our patreon ($3/month): https://www.patreon.com/buriedsecrets

Follow us on instagram @buriedsecretspodcast, and follow Jen @jenmariewilde.

E-mail us at buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com

 

Sources

Things mentioned

Websites about William Fuld

Historical articles and advertisements about William Fuld

  • Ouija Board is Worth Million. The Daily Times (Davenport, Iowa) · Tue, Aug 17, 1920 · Page 8
  • Who Invented Ouija? The Economist (Clay Center, Kansas) · Tue, Apr 6, 1920 · Page 3
  • “Ouija Board Has Chance Now to Pick Inventor” The Topeka Daily Capital (Topeka, Kansas) · Sun, Mar 14, 1920 · Page 11

Check out the shownotes for the rest of the series to see all of the sources used.

Listen to the rest of the Ouija board series:

Don’t miss our past episodes:

We take a look at the board’s invention, in particular two women behind it, Helen Peters and Ouida: a highly-educated, unconventional medium who later ended up denouncing Ouija, and the eccentric, dog-obsessed English writer whose name may have inspired the board’s.

In 1886, homemade talking boards became a new “Ohio craze” that newspapers reported widely around the country. Five years later, a man named Charles Kennard started a company to create his own talking board, which he claims he invented (though the prototype may have been made by his neighbor, a coffin maker turned undertaker.)

But what most people don’t know is that one woman’s involvement in the Ouija board’s creation had been totally written out of the history, until Ouija historian Robert Murch unearthed her story. We look at how a woman named Helen Peters was integral in ensuring the board got patented. She also was at the Ouija board session that the board’s name came from, and wore a locket around her neck with another woman’s name, Ouida, which is where the name “Ouija” may have emerged from. 

Ouida was a real character–an extremely prolific, oddball author of somewhat scandalous 19th-century adventure novels–so we take a look at her life and wonder how we’d also never heard of her.

We’ll pick up again next week to talk about what happened to Kennard’s company, and what happened to Ouija as the 20th century dawned.

 

You can listen to more audio on our patreon ($3/month): https://www.patreon.com/buriedsecrets

Follow us on instagram @buriedsecretspodcast, and follow Jen @jenmariewilde.

E-mail us at buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com

Pictures

A couple demonstrating the use of a talking board

The New Talking Board: The Mysterious Amusement Which is Fascinating Ohio People. The News, Frederick, Maryland, Sat, Apr 10 1886

Elijah Bond's Patent for the Kennard Ouija Board

Elijah Bond’s Patent for the Kennard Ouija Board

Planchette and Automatic Writing Sources

Websites about the Ouija board

Historical articles and advertisements about the Ouija Board and its invention

  • The New Talking Board: The Mysterious Amusement Which is Fascinating Ohio People. The News (Frederick, Maryland) · Sat, Apr 10, 1886 · Page 3

  • An Ohio Craze: The Mysterious Talking Board and Table Over Which

  • Ohioans Are Agitated. (Reprinted from the NY Tribute.) The Clay Democrat (Clay Center, Kansas) · Thu, Apr 22, 1886 · Page 2

  • The Columbus Journal (Columbus, Nebraska) · Wed, Apr 21, 1886 · Page 2

  • Ad. The Norfolk Landmark (Norfolk, Virginia) · Sat, Jan 31, 1891 · Page 2

  • Ad. The Norfolk Landmark (Norfolk, Virginia) · Fri, Apr 3, 1891 · Page 3

  • Ad. The Sun (New York, New York) · Sat, Mar 14, 1891 · Page 9

  • Ad. Fall River Daily Evening News (Fall River, Massachusetts) · Sat, Oct 3, 1891 · Page 4

  • Ad. Pittsburg dispatch. [volume] (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, February 01, 1891, SECOND PART, Page 12, Image 12

  • Ad. St. Joseph Gazette-Herald (St. Joseph, Missouri) · Sat, Apr 16, 1892 · Page 1

  • The Indianapolis Journal (Indianapolis, Indiana) · Sun, Dec 6, 1891 · Page 14

  • Ouija Board. The Thayer News (Thayer, Kansas) · Fri, Apr 8, 1892 · Page 4

Check out the shownotes for the rest of the series to see all of the sources used.

Listen to the rest of the Ouija board series:

Don’t miss our past episodes:

Starting with the automatic writing method planchette, we begin a series about Ouija boards. We’ll dig into the strange history of the much admired and maligned method of communicating with spirits and/or having fun at parties.

Before Ouija, there was planchette. Invented in Paris in the 1850s, planchette was a method of automatic writing. Much like the planchette we recognize from today’s Ouija boards, it was a heart-shaped plank of wood. But it was much larger than today’s planchettes, rested on wheels or casters, and had a slot to put a pencil through. One or several people would rest their hands on the planchette, and see what messages come through.

Highlights include: The Spiritualist movement, weird personifications of “Planchette,” plenty of alarmist rhetoric about this popular parlor game/occult technique, and the story of a young woman in New Orleans who supposedly died as a result of her obsession with planchette

This is the first of ?? episodes about Ouija boards. We’ll be back next week to talk about the invention of Ouija boards and spirit boards!

 

You can listen to more audio on our patreon ($3/month): https://www.patreon.com/buriedsecrets

Follow us on instagram @buriedsecretspodcast, and follow Jen @jenmariewilde.

E-mail us at buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com

For pictures of the Hawthorne Hotel, check out Investigating the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, Part 1 .

Planchette and Automatic Writing Sources

Books mentioning planchette

Where to buy planchette

Websites

Historical Articles and advertisements about planchette

  • The Confessions of Reformed Planchettist from Harper’s Monthly Magazine
  • Planchette. The Buffalo Commercial (Buffalo, New York) · Sat, Jul 11, 1868 · Page 2
  • Planchette. Burlington Times (Burlington, Vermont) · Sat, Apr 4, 1868 · Page 2
  • Planchette. Daily Press and Herald (Knoxville, Tennessee) · Wed, Jul 29, 1868 · Page 4
  • Planchette. Gold Hill Daily News (Gold Hill, Nevada) · Tue, Jul 14, 1868 · Page 2
  • Planchette. New Orleans Republican (New Orleans, Louisiana) · Thu, Jul 2, 1868 · Page 2
  • Ad Planchette Quad City Times Sat Jul 25 1868
  • Ad Planchette The Daily Milwaukee News Wed Jul 15 1868
  • Ad Planchette The Buffalo Commercial Sat Jul 11 1868
  • Mr Home The Pall Mall Gazette Fri May 15 1868
  • My Acquaintance With Planchette The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer Sat Jul 25 1868
  • Planchette Star Tribune Fri Jul 3 1868
  • Planchette The Daily Evening Express Sat Jul 11 1868
  • Planchette The Native Virginian Fri Jul 24 1868
  • Planchette The Scranton Republican Sat Aug 8 1868
  • Planchette The Times Democrat Wed Jul 1 1868
  • Planchette The Times Picayune Tue Sep 15 1868
  • Planchette The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer Wed Jul 8 1868
  • Planchette Is Simply Nowhere. Herald and Tribune Thu Apr 29 1886

 

Don’t miss our past episodes:

Continuing our look at Salem’s most haunted hotel, we unearth a strange synchronicity in the history of the land that the Hawthorne Hotel stands on and take a look at the mysterious Salem Marine Society.

Following up on a lead that Chris found last time, we dive into what happened at the site of Salem’s famously haunted Hawthorne Hotel. We find a really strange set of circumstances that we can’t believe aren’t spelled out more in many of the sources we found online. We also correct a big inaccuracy perpetuated by many websites about the Hawthorne Hotel.

Highlights include: Arson, a man named Estes, two buildings with the same name burning down on the same weekend, a ship’s cabin located on the hotel’s rooftop, and more

For pictures of the Hawthorne Hotel, check out Investigating the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, Part 1 .

Sources

Books

Ghosts of Salem: Haunts of the Witch City by Sam Baltrusis

Websites

Articles

  • The Franklin Building. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)October 25, 1860
  • Alarm of Fire. Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts)March 29, 1825
  • Advertisement. Salem Observer (published as SALEM OBSERVER.) (Salem, Massachusetts)June 19, 1824
  • Advertisement. Salem Observer (Salem, Massachusetts)April 7, 1827
    [Mr. Editor; Marine; Society; Franklin; Building] Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts)June 14, 1833
  • Advertisement.Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts)July 19, 1836
  • Advertisement. Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts)November 8, 1836
  • Fire. Boston Courier (Boston, Massachusetts)January 30, 1845
  • News Article. Boston Daily Times (published as BOSTON TIMES.) (Boston, Massachusetts)January 30, 1845
  • Another Serious Fire. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)January 30, 1845
  • Incendiarism. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts) January 30, 1845
  • News Article. Boston Traveler (published as AMERICAN TRAVELLER.) (Boston, Massachusetts)January 31, 1845
  • $500 reward. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)February 6, 1845
  • News Article. Boston Semi-weekly Atlas (published as The Boston Semi-Weekly Atlas.) (Boston, Massachusetts)June 24, 1846
  • Events in Salem and Vicinity during the Year 1846. Salem Observer (published as The Salem Observer.) (Salem, Massachusetts)January 2, 1847
  • News Article. Boston Evening Transcript (published as Boston Evening Transcript.) (Boston, Massachusetts)January 4, 1859
  • News Article. Boston Traveler (published as Boston Daily Traveller.) (Boston, Massachusetts)January 5, 1859
  • News Article. Boston Traveler (published as Boston Daily Traveller.) (Boston, Massachusetts)January 5, 1859
  • Fire In Franklin Building. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)January 6, 1859
  • Re Opened. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)November 19, 1860
  • News Article. Boston Evening Transcript (published as Boston Evening Transcript.) (Boston, Massachusetts)October 23, 1860
  • The Franklin Building Fire. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)October 25, 1860
  • Franklin Building Destroyed. Salem Observer (published as The Salem Observer) (Salem, Massachusetts)October 27, 1860
  • Salem And Vicinity. Salem Observer (published as The Salem Observer) (Salem, Massachusetts)March 9, 1861
  • Salem And Vicinity. Salem Observer (published as The Salem Observer) (Salem, Massachusetts)May 4, 1861
  • Salem And Vicinity. Supreme Judicial Court. Salem Observer (published as The Salem Observer.) (Salem, Massachusetts)November 16, 1861
  • Removals. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)November 18, 1861
  • The New Armory Of The Cadets. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)February 20, 1862
  • Freaks Of Lightning. Salem Observer (published as The Salem Observer.) (Salem, Massachusetts)August 2, 1862
  • Salem Marine Society Centennial. Address By The Master, Capt. Nathaniel Brown. Salem Register (Salem, Massachusetts)June 12, 1871

Also see sources used for Investigating the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, Part 1 and Investigating the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, Part 2. 

 

Don’t miss our past episodes, like The Smallpox Hospital, aka Renwick Ruin, on Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 1, The Renwick Ruin and Charity Hospital, Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 2, and Playing the Ghost in 19th Century Australia .

We deep dive into the stories of other guests who’ve stayed at the haunted Hawthorne Hotel in Salem and seen ghosts and other phenomena, as well as the hotel’s history.

After sifting through all of the haunting-related reviews of the Hawthorne Hotel on Trip Advisor, we talk about the most interesting ones (including reviews from some guests who don’t believe the hotel is haunted.)

Highlights include: ghostly cats, Ouija boards, the ghost of a sailor, glitchy phone calls, disembodied voices, cold spots

 

Sources

Trip Advisor

Check out our first episode about the Hawthorne Hotel for our full list of sources, as well as pictures of the hotel.

 

Don’t miss our past episodes, like The Smallpox Hospital, aka Renwick Ruin, on Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 1, The Renwick Ruin and Charity Hospital, Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 2, and Playing the Ghost in 19th Century Australia .

We share our strange encounters at Salem’s famously haunted Hawthorne Hotel, including audio from an Estes session where we spoke to some of the hotel’s spirits.

In part 1 of our look at the Hawthorne Hotel, we look at some of our experiences at the Hawthorne, and share audio from our (we believe successful) attempt to speak to some of the hotel’s entities.
 
Highlights include: a possible sleep paralysis episode, a (briefly) missing wedding ring, a conversation with a squid fisherman, a not-so-friendly entity named Justin, and our first attempt at a Estes session.
 
Resources and things we mentioned:
 
 
 
 
 
The company Chris bought the SB-7 Spirit Box from, Ghost Augustine (they also sell on Amazon)–definitely recommend this place because they replaced the first spirit box they sent with no hassle. Chris thought it was defective, but it turned out that Chris was just using it wrong. They were extremely nice about it and had great customer service.

Pictures

 
Chandelier in our room at the Hawthorne Hotel

Chandelier in our room at the Hawthorne Hotel

Hallway at the Hawthorne Hotel

Hallway at the Hawthorne Hotel

Our room at the Hawthorne Hotel, Room 403

Our room at the Hawthorne Hotel, Room 403

Jen piled pillows in front of the closet in an attempt to keep the spirits inside

Jen piled pillows in front of the closet in an attempt to keep the spirits inside

One of the Hawthorne Hotel's "No Access" rooms

One of the Hawthorne Hotel’s “No Access” rooms

Hawthorne Hotel exterior

Hawthorne Hotel exterior

Hawthorne Hotel exterior (Witch Museum seen in the distance)

Hawthorne Hotel exterior (Witch Museum seen in the distance)

Hawthorne Hotel exterior seen from Essex Street

Hawthorne Hotel exterior seen from Essex Street

The Hawthorne Hotels' Grand Ballroom

The Hawthorne Hotels’ Grand Ballroom

Jen's selfie in the ballroom (Chris' ring seen on the floor)

Jen’s selfie in the ballroom (Chris’ ring seen on the floor)

Chris' ring on the floor (we think)

Chris’ ring on the floor (we think)

 

Chandelier in the Hawthorne Hotels' Grand Ballroom

Chandelier in the Hawthorne Hotels’ Grand Ballroom

Lobby of the Hawthorne Hotel

Lobby of the Hawthorne Hotel

Lobby of the Hawthorne Hotel

Lobby of the Hawthorne Hotel

 
 

Sources

Books

  • Ghosts of Salem: Haunts of the Witch City by Sam Baltrusis
  • Haunted Salem & Beyond by Lynda Lee Macken

Articles

 

Don’t miss our past episodes, like The Smallpox Hospital, aka Renwick Ruin, on Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 1, The Renwick Ruin and Charity Hospital, Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 2, and Playing the Ghost in 19th Century Australia .

Did you know that in late 19th century Australia, ordinary people would dip sheets in toxic glowing paint and run around at night pretending to be ghosts?

Neither did we, but Chris dug up this oddball story from Jen’s home state of Victoria and was excited to tell Jen all about it! The story involves a angry mob chasing a preacher; a protective mom siccing her dog on a creepy dude; calls for vigilante justice; hallucinogenic moonshine and a “very fine” draper’s dummy; a lady dressed up in a glow-in-the-dark wedding dress and playing guitar on a rooftop, and more.
article called Thrashing a Ghost

Example of an article with illustration about a ghost hoaxer being thrashed in Connington near Perth, Western Australia, Sunday Times, 27 November 1898, p. 9. (from https://prov.vic.gov.au/ )

 
 

Sources

Podcasts

https://talesfromratcity.com/2017/09/23/episode-three-2/

https://talesfromratcity.com/2017/04/27/affairs-of-the-spirit/

Websites

The Atlas Obscura article

Article on Victoria government site 

https://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2014/12/19/4151931.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohocks

https://www.pascalbonenfant.com/18c/clubs/jt_themohocks.html

https://prov.vic.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/media/provenance2014_waldron.pdf

https://federation.edu.au/news/articles/telling-the-tales-from-rat-city

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capotain

Articles

 

Images Used in this Post

  • Example of an article with illustration about a ghost hoaxer being thrashed in Connington near Perth, Western Australia, Sunday Times, 27 November 1898, p. 9. (from https://prov.vic.gov.au/ )

 

Don’t miss our past episodes, like The Smallpox Hospital, aka Renwick Ruin, on Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 1 and The Renwick Ruin and Charity Hospital, Roosevelt Island, NYC – Part 2.

We return to Blackwell’s Island to look at the now-destroyed Charity Hospital and the Renwick Ruin as it stands on today’s Roosevelt Island.

In part two of our two-part look at the Smallpox Hospital / Renwick Ruin, we talk about the Gothic ruin of the Smallpox Hospital that remains on Roosevelt Island, as well as the much larger ruin of the 19th century Charity Hospital (also FKA Penitentiary Hospital, City Hospital, and Island Hospital) that’s since been torn down.

We also discuss the connection between Charity Hospital on Blackwell’s Island and the Elmhurst Hospital Center, which is now famous as the epicenter of the current coronavirus crisis here in Queens, New York. 

Note: This episode is a little darker than part 1, with a few mentions of suicide and some conversation about COVID-19. (Chris did leave out the parts about the awful medical experiments that happened at Charity Hospital, though.)

Don’t miss part 1 of our series, for more background on the island and some historical images of the island in the 1800s.

The Renwick Ruin Today

Photo of the Renwick Ruin in 2019

Renwick Ruin in 2019 (photo taken by Chris)

Photo of the Renwick Ruin in 2019

Renwick Ruin in 2019 (photo taken by Chris)

Photo of the Renwick Ruin in 2019

Renwick Ruin in 2019 (photo taken by Chris)

Photo of the Renwick Ruin in 2019

Renwick Ruin in 2019 (photo taken by Chris)

 

The Charity Hospital in the 19th Century

Engraving of Charity Hospital on Roosevelt Island

“Charity Hospital [Blackwell’s Island]” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1801 – 1886.

Stereoscopic view of Charity Hospital at Blackwell's Island

“Hospital at Black Wells Island, N.Y.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 – 1930.

Sources

Check out all the sources used for this episode in the shownotes for part 1.

Images Used in this Post

  • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. “Charity Hospital [Blackwell’s Island]” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1801 – 1886. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47da-2356-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
  • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. “Hospital at Black Wells Island, N.Y.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 – 1930. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-2090-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

We take a look at the ruins of a forgotten Gothic hospital on Roosevelt Island in New York City


A crumbling ruin is all that’s left of the old Smallpox Hospital that used to operate on Roosevelt Island, an island that lies between Manhattan and Queens in New York City. Nowadays, the ruin lies in a park and is lit up by floodlights at night. It’s a picturesque shell of the old Gothic building, and is popular with urban explorers, but the story behind it is a fascinating one.

Originally built by James Renwick Jr, the superstar 19th century architect who built St. Patrick’s Catherdral in Manhattan, and often called “the Renwick Ruin” these days, the old Smallpox Hospital was built in the 1850s.

At the time, Roosevelt Island (then called Blackwell’s Island) was an isolated “haven” for the poor and sick–many wealthy Manhattanites wrote about the picturesque island, more garden than prison. But in reality, the island housed an infamous penitentiary (where William Macy Tweed, aka Boss Tweed, was once held), a workhouse and almshouse for the poor and sick, the infamous New York Lunatic Asylum (where muckraking journalist Nellie Bly got herself admitted to expose the horrific conditions), as well as a few hospitals, including the Smallpox Hospital.


In part one of our two-part look at the Blackwell’s Island Smallpox Hospital / Renwick Ruin, we talk about the history of Roosevelt Island and the hospital itself, as well as a bit of the history of smallpox in the world and in New York City. We’re coming to you from lockdown in Queens, New York, so we also talk a bit about how 19th century Blackwell’s Island relates to the world today, especially with the current coronavirus crisis. We also talk about about some paranormal investigations we want to do on Roosevelt Island once we’re cleared to hang out again.

Important Note: In the episode, we talk about wanting to do a paranormal investigation at the hospital. To be clear, we want to do an Estes session from outside the ruin’s fence. If you’re in the area, you definitely shouldn’t attempt to enter the hospital ruin itself–the floorboards are very unstable and crumbling, and breaking into the hospital could be extremely dangerous, even fatal. Like us, try to content yourself with looking at it from the outside and watching videos of the interiors from experienced urban explorers.

Roosevelt (Blackwell’s) Island in the 19th Century

Stereoscope image of Renwick Smallpox Hospital
“Smallpox Hospital, Black Wells Island, N.Y.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 – 1930.
A color image of Blackwell's Island in the 19th Century, seen from 86th Street in Manhattan
“Blackwells Island, East River. From Eighty Sixth Street, New York” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1862.
The Penitentiary on Blackwell's Island
“Penitentiary : Blackwells Island.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1840 – 1870.

Engraving of Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell's Island

“View of the lunatic asylum and mad house, on Blackwell’s Island, New York” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1853.

Sources

These sources were used for parts 1 and 2 of the episode on the Renwick Ruin.

Books

Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th Century New York by Stacy Horn

Websites

Articles

  • National Philanthropist, Date: January 9, 1829, “Blackwell’s Island”
  • Peabody’s Parlour Journal, 2/1/1834, Vol. 1 Issue 5, p2-2, 2/5p, 1 IllustrationIllustration; found on p2
  • Blackwell’s Island Prison. Youth’s Cabinet. 6/27/1839, Vol. 2 Issue 26, p101-102. 2p.
  • Blackwell’s Island. New-York Organ & Temperance Safeguard, Date: August 26, 1848
  • Drunkenness at Blackwell’s Island. New-York Organ & Temperance Safeguard. September 9, 1848
  • “Penitentiary on Blackwell’s Island, New York.” Journal of Humanity & Herald of the American Temperance Society. 07/08/1829, Vol. 1 Issue 7, p28-28. 1/5p.
  • “HOSPITALS ON BLACKWELL’S ISLAND, NEW YORK.” Boston Medical & Surgical Journal. 11/10/1847, Vol. 37 Issue 15, p300-302. 3p.
  • “The Prison at Blackwell’s Island” By: L. M. C. Liberator. 10/28/1842, Vol. 10 Issue 43, p172-172. 1/5p. , Database: Slavery and Abolition, 1789-1887
  • “CASES AT THE PENITENTIARY HOSPITAL ON BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” CLAUDIAN (AUTHOR). Boston Medical & Surgical Journal. 8/16/1848, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p57-60. 4p.
  • “STATE OF PRISONERS ON BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” ERBEN, HENRY. New York Municipal Gazette. 03/02/1846, Vol. 1 Issue 38, p527-527. 1/6p. , Database: American Literary Periodicals, 1835-1858
  • “Blackwell’s Island.” American Statesman. 07/31/1847, Vol. 1 Issue 26, p408-409. 2p. , Database: American Political Periodicals, 1715-1891
  • “Doings at Blackwell’s Island.” New-York Organ & Temperance Safeguard. 12/02/1848, Vol. 8 Issue 23, p180-180. 1/9p.
  • “The New Work-House on Blackwell’s Island.” Friend: A Religious & Literary Journal. 12/7/1850, Vol. 24 Issue 12, p90-90. 1/3p.
  • “No. 12.–NEW YORK. Criminal and Humane Institutions.–Police.–Workhouse on Blackwell’s Island.” Pennsylvania Journal of Prison Discipline & Philanthropy. 1851 1st Quarter, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p59-60. 2p.
  • “CROTON AQUEDUCT SUPPLY OF WATER TO BLACKWELL’S ISLAND BY MEANS OF GUTTA PERCHA PIPE.” C. (AUTHOR). Appleton’s Mechanics’ Magazine & Engineers’ Journal. Dec1851, Vol. 1 Issue 12, p738-741. 4p.
  • “SUPPLY OF WATER TO BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” Friend: A Religious & Literary Journal. 11/27/1852, Vol. 26 Issue 11, p82-83. 2p.
  • “ALM HOUSE, BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” Gleason’s Pictorial. 10/09/1852, Vol. 3 Issue 15, p225-225. 1p. 1 Illustration, 1 Graphic, Symbol or Logo.
  • “PENITENTIARY, BLACKWELL’S ISLAND, NEW YORK.” Gleason’s Pictorial (Boston, MA – 1853-1854). 05/28/1853, Vol. 4 Issue 100, preceding p338-338. 1p. 1 Illustration, 1 Graphic, Symbol or Logo.
  • “LUNATIC ASYLUM, BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” National Magazine. Oct1855, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p314-315. 2p. 1 Illustration.
  • “Randall’s and Blackwell’s Islands.” Independent (New York, NY 1848-1876). 09/27/1849, p172-172. 1/9p.
  • “BURNING OF BLACKWELL’S ISLAND HOSPITAL.” Brother Jonathan (New York, NY). 2/20/1858, Vol. 17 Issue 327, p003-003. 1/9p.
  • “BLACKWELL’S ISLAND HOSPITAL.” Episcopal Recorder. 8/7/1858, Vol. 26 Issue 19, p74-74. 1/9p.
  • “A VISIT TO THE LUNATIC ASYLUM ON BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” Harper’s Weekly. 03/19/1859, Vol. 3 Issue 116, p184-186. 3p. 10 Illustrations.
  • “THE WORK-HOUSE–BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. Nov1866, Vol. 33 Issue 198, p683-702. 20p. 19 Illustrations.
  • “VISIT TO BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” FOSDICK. American Odd Fellow: A Monthly Magazine. Apr1869, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p208-211. 4p. , Database: Masons, Odd-Fellows and Other Societal Periodicals, 1794-1877
  • “SMALL-POX HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL’S ISLAND, F. Y.” New York Medical Journal: A Monthly Record of Medicine & the Collateral Sciences. Feb1875, Vol. 21 Issue 2, p173-176. 4p.
  • “PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS ON BLACKWELL’S ISLAND.” Harper’s Weekly. 2/6/1869, Vol. 13 Issue 632, p91-91. 1/6p.
  • “SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.” Life Illustrated. 01/24/1857, Vol. 3 Issue 13, p101-101. 1/9p. , Database: Periodicals of the American West, 1779-1881

 

Images Used in this Post

  • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. “Blackwells Island, East River. From Eighty Sixth Street, New York” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1862. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/5e66b3e8-e879-d471-e040-e00a180654d7
  • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. “Penitentiary : Blackwells Island.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1840 – 1870. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-2793-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
  • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. “Smallpox Hospital, Black Wells Island, N.Y.” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1850 – 1930. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-208e-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
  • The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. “View of the lunatic asylum and mad house, on Blackwell’s Island, New York” The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1853. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/5e66b3e8-d3cf-d471-e040-e00a180654d7