A look at some female ghosts of Astoria, Queens, in New York City.

Note: There’s discussion of chattel slavery after the 26 minute mark.

Highlights include:
• The American president who was supposedly shot on his way to see a haunting
• A ghost who disappears if she stops knitting
• A lady in white and a hag who haunt the same block
• A shameful side of Astoria’s history

Episode Script

DISCLAIMER: I’m providing this version of the script for accessibility purposes. It hasn’t been proofread, so please excuse typos. There are also some things that may differ between the final episode and this draft script. Please treat the episode audio as the final product. 

Garfield Ghost

  • “Garfield’s Ghost Hunt: Was About to Visit a Haunted House When Shot” The sun (New York [N.Y.]), January 14, 1900:
    • So, for a bit of background, for those of you who, like me, forgot what president James A. Garfield’s deal was: he was the president who was shot by an assassin 4 months after his inauguration in 1881, and died 2 months later.
      • I’m not gonna get into a ton of detail about his assassination, though one fun fact is that the gunman purchased the gun specifically because he thought it’d look good in a museum. Back then, presidents weren’t guarded, so Garfield was taking the train to NJ from DC, so  the assassin shot him in the train station in FC.
    • Let’s get into this article. Basically, there once was a newspaperman name Eugene Virgil Smalley, who was notable because he looked exactly like Garfield and had lots of similar interests. The two of them became friends.
    • To read from the article:
      • But the resemblance was not merely physical. They had many habits of mind and sympathies in common, a circumstance, among others, which made them warm friends. There was in Garfield’s rather poetic temperament a strong vein of mysticism, a fondness for the occult which needed little cultivation to have led Guiteau’s victim into paths which other men of great talent and strong imagination have followed until led by them into strange faiths and delusions. Theophile Gautier says there is in every man’s mind a certain dark chamber where bats of superstition lurk, only needing the right kind of prod to set them fluttering their uncanny wings, obscuring the reason with all sorts of dark shadows and queer phantoms.
      • In the case of Garfield this dark chamber was large and the door was easily opened, if a discreet and sympathetic hand touched the spring.
      • . . . At about the time of Gen. Garfield’s inauguration there was much stir among New York spiritualists over certain strange occurrences said to be taking place in a house in Astoria. The owner of this, a hard-headed business man who had amassed a large fortune in the distinctly material occupation of making pig iron, had had the misfortune the winter before to lose a very beautiful daughter whom he idolized. She died in Florida after a lingering illness. The shock utterly shattered her father’s nerves. He brooded upon his loss until it became the fixed idea of his life.
    • The article goes on to say that the man tried to distract himself with work, but as soon as he got home every day, he felt devastated again.
    • However, one day, he was absorbed in thinking about something work-related, and for once didn’t have his daughter on his mind when he got home. I’ll read some more of the article:
      • She was quite out of his mind when he walked into the large front parlor and started to go through the open sliding doors to the rear parlor, the windows of which overlooked the lawn reaching down to the river.
      • And by one of those windows in her favorite nook sat his daughter. So real, so true to life, in every detail of feature and pose was the vision, that, with his mind for the moment unburdened as it was from the sense of his loss, he for an instant felt no surprise at seeing her where he had seen her hundreds of times before. He advanced a step toward her, whereat she looked laughingly and brightly at him, but held up a warning finger which brought him to a standstill with, fr the first time, a realization of all that had befallen.
    • The article continues, saying he told himself he must have imagined it. He closed his eyes, rubbed them, opened them again, but his daughter was still there. However, she was doing something strange:
      • “both her hands [were] now busy weaving a curious filmy lace which rolled slowly to her feet in a sort of fleecy spray which dimmed and melted out of sight.”
    • I don’t know if this is ectoplasm or what?
    • He tried to come closer, his daughter raised a finger in warning, and then kept creating this “ghostly lace” and it seemed like whenever she stopped making the lace, she started to dim, and when she restarted making it, she became more solid.
    • So then word of this apparition got out, and Smalley heard of it, as did a bunch of spiritualist mediums. Tons of them came. To read from the article:
      • “Every night, there were seances at the Astoria house. Mr. Smalley was present at nearly all of them for several weeks. . . . He wrote column after column in his New York paper concerning the events at the Astoria house–each story very striking in its minute simplicity of detail and quite like a chapter out of “Spirite” in the delicate beauty of the manifestations.”
    • Smalley became more and more interested, so of course he mentioned this ghost to his friend, Garfield.
    • Garfield wanted to see the ghost, but now that he was president, there was no real way for him to visit. But Garfield was about to give a commencement speech at Williams College, and Smalley said that on his way back to DC, he could spend a night in NYC and come to the Astoria house in secret.
    • So all the arrangements were made. A famous medium was hired for the evening, and supposedly Garfield was really looking forward to the visit. But on his way out of DC, at the train station, he was shot, and that led to his death.
    • It was said that the haunted house in Astoria continued to be haunted. But now it was haunted not just by the daughter. There were supposed sightings of Napoleon, Shakespeare, and other famous people who fraudulent mediums tended to claim to see. But now the host of ghosts was joined by Garfield’s spirit.
    • The man who lived there believed in the ghosts, who supposedly comforted him and made him feel less alone, until his eventual death.
  • I looked for the articles that Smalley wrote about this haunting, but couldn’t find anything after searching through multiple archives. However, I did find that there’s a lot of stuff about places that Garfield supposedly haunts, including the gothic castle that houses his remains in Cleveland, Ohio.

The White Lady of Astoria

  • First, a woman in white definition: White Lady – Wikipedia
  • The Newtown Pentacle, a great blog run by Mitch Waxman, reports stories of hauntings here in Astoria at 44th street between Broadway and 34th avenue. Here are some of the stories he’s documented:
    • “My former neighbor, a sensitive “lifer”, when confronted with “Have you ever seen a Ghost?” related that there was an apparition on the entire block. A lady in white who moved from house to house. He continued on, saying that his mother, himself- and his tenants- had experienced apparitions. Indeed, the subject was well known amongst the generations of children that had grown up here, and that the phantom was called “The White Lady”. The following text is used with permission, and comes from that stalwart friend…
    • My mother’s story is this:
    • When my brother and I were very small, around 2 and 5 or 3 and 6 respectively, we both had high fevers and were sleeping in my mother’s bed. My mother said she heard someone walk down our hallway, and she assumed it was my father, as he worked late into the night.  She then says she smelled very sweet perfume, and felt someone sit down on the edge of the bed (she was sitting with us, watching over us).
    • She never saw anybody, but rather felt a presence.  She said she knew it was the presence of a ‘lady’—with the resonance of the word being someone higher in society, graceful and composed. The presence let it be known to her–how I dont know– that she was there for a good reason; that she was there because she was worried about my brother and I, and would watch over us and protect us.  My mother added that she thought the ‘lady’ was the wife of the person who owned the land way before our house was built, but Im not sure if that was heresay she might have picked up on in future years.”
    • “My tenant’s  story:
    • My tenant stopped and asked me one day in front of the house. He asked me if we had a ghost  living there, and before I told him, I asked him what he meant.  He said he dreamt about a ‘lady’.  I asked him to describe her, and he said her hair was done up in an old fashioned bun, she was older, her hair was white, and she wore a dress that was cinched around the neck, the way they wore in earlier years.
    • He also said that he had once peered outside the backyard window, and saw someone looking up at him intently. He said that it was a spirit guide.
    • My tenant has told me he is sensitive to phenomenon.  He even described meeting a woman and immediately ‘knowing’ that the woman was pregnant.  He in fact asked her, and she said yes.”
    • “My ghostly experience, front bedroom 1st floor.
    • Well, it was the first night staying in that apartment. I spent the day helping my girlfriend move the rest of her stuff in. And put a large mirror up at the foot of the bed facing north (toward broadway).
    • So anyway, somehow I awoke between 2 and 3am (at least I feel like I was awake), and saw a kind of a dark shadowy figure move/walk from one side of the room toward the foot of the bed staring at me. Seemed like an older women or a deadly looking middle-aged women with long hair past shoulders staring me down as she crept toward the foot of the bed. She lowered down slowly as if she was going to go under the bed but went out of sight at my feet. Almost instantly I felt my feet tingle and begin to shake like I was shivering and then both legs entirely.
    • I tried to kick my legs to make it stop but it only made it worse as my legs were basically shaking out of control and woosh it went up my trunk to my neck and my whole body was shaking and my head flexed backward hard into the pillow. I called out for my girlfriend, but my face muscles were very tight – “help… help… me…” which felt like I was wide awake- I know I was.
    • I began to also feel a pull toward the bottom the bed and toward the wall that the mirror was on. And as soon as it felt like it was going to throw my body off the bed or across the room or through into the mirror, whoosh it left down through my body and out my feet and was standing at the foot of the bed staring at me smiling/kind of laughing at me, and turned toward the mirror and walked through.
    • That’s it, I was wide awake for 2 hours trying to contemplate if that really happened or what. Nothing like that has ever happend before or since.
    • The only other thing that happened was a couple of weeks later- a glass picture frame seemed to jump off the wall and shattered on the ground in the middle of the night at 3 or 4 am. The same day I put a 2nd mirror up in that bedroom.”
  • The Queens Chronicle reported the supposed explanation for this:
    • “On this eastern Astoria stretch, several residents have reported spotting a woman wearing a high-collared dress with her white hair in a bun — she’s known as the White Lady of Astoria. Sometimes, according to those who have spotted her, she appears with a sick child, and witnesses often smell lavender when she’s spotted.
    • The White Lady, Carter says, is believed to be Elizabeth Hallet.
    • William Hallet, Hallet’s third husband, purchased land in Astoria after he and Elizabeth fled from Connecticut because she had divorced her second husband due to his being insane. Insanity, though, wasn’t a legal excuse for separation back then so Elizabeth was technically guilty of polygamy, which was punishable by death.
    • Hallet’s descendants were later killed by slaves who were not allowed to go to church — it’s believed the slayings were Queens’ first capital murders.”
  • DoNYC has this claim about the white lady:
    • ” This spirit, known as “White Lady of Astoria” was killed by her two slaves around 1705. Her ghost is said to haunt the 44th Street block to this day, and can sometimes be spotted with another ghost-like figure of a small child.”
  • The NY post did a writeup of the White Lady as well, based on Mitch Waxman’s research:
    • According to Andrea Janes, founder of the Boroughs of the Dead walking tours, the “White Lady of Astoria” is a Mrs. Hallet, whose family was killed by their two slaves around 1705. The pregnant mother, after finding her husband and two children murdered, ran away and ended up drowning while trying to cross a marsh.
    • While the Hallet farmhouse is long gone, her ghost is said to haunt the row houses that were erected on a 44th Street block in the early 20th century — though she’s seen as a benevolent spirit.
    • “One friend, who described [the ghost] sitting with her and her brother when they were ill, described it as a comforting experience,” said Waxman, who runs the history Web site the Newtown Pentacle and lives a block away from the homes. Waxman said that residing in a haunted neighborhood is preferable to living on top of a chemical factory. “I’d rather have the White Lady of Astoria than benzine.”
  • I’ve talked before about the dark history of slavery in NYC. I think I talked about that in the episode I did talking about Trinity Church and St. Paul’s Chapel, and their hauntings. And the reason why I felt it was important to talk about it was that it’s essential context when thinking about the history of an area from a paranormal perspective. NYC–the city, its wealth, etc–was built by enslaved people.
  • Slavery existed in NYC until 1827, which is way longer than many other places in the northeast. There was even a literal slave market in the financial district, at Wall Street and Pearl Street, which was open for 51 years and which sold black people and indigenous people of all genders and ages.
    • History of Long Island City, New York by J. S Kelsey; 1896:
      • “Negro whippers were appointed in various towns. April 4, 1729, the town of Newtown appointed William Tallier “general whipper ” for the town. Besides being whipped, slaves were often branded in the forehead with a hot iron. On the night of Januarj’ 24, 170S, William Hallett, jr., wife, and five children were murdered by an Indian named “Sam” and a negress, who were slaves of the family. The motive was to secure possession of the land. This extraordinary tragedy absorbed popular attention for a long time, and was influential in legislation for the suppression of slave conspiracies. Speedy, though terrible, punishment awaited the perpetrators of the crime, who were burned at the stake at Jamaica, February 2, 1708. The Hallett home was in the vicinity of what is now known as the “German Settlements.”
      • January 27, 1753, three children and a negro of John Parcells were drowned in the East River.
      • . . . It was many a day after the English and Dutch had selected new homes in a new world — in fact generations passed, before there was a store within the present precincts of this city. Domestic wants were simple and few, and were readily supplied by industry. What was desired beyond home production was found across the river in New York. Purchasers thither went without money, and in place thereof took along for exchange produce, tobacco, beer and negro boys.”
  • John Jay college has a database you can search to find records of enslaved people and enslavers. I looked up records for Newtown, Queens, which is pretty much present day Astoria, and found 11 pages of results, featuring a bunch of familiar names who I’ve talked about before. I will say, too: not all the records are tagged with Newtown, and some may have been tagged with typos, so these numbers are actually artificially under-representing the number of people these families enslaved.
    • Also, as a sidenote: I wish that I could highlight the stories of the enslaved people, rather than just ordering this as a inventory of enslavers and the numbers of humans they owned. However, the records of people who were enslaved are extremely incomplete. For example, when I search for enslaved people’s records in Newtown, Queens, I only get 4 results, and only three of them have names attached: Tom, born in 1754 and enslaved by a man named Charles grant; Nero, no birth year listed, enslaved by a man named William Garden, and Andrew, no birth year, enslaved by a man named Andrew Springsteen. They have no last names. Andrew’s information comes from the records of the New-York Manumission Society, and while I can’t read the manuscript (because it’s handwritten and crossed, which makes it illegible to me), I’m hoping that means that he may have been freed, since that’s what the society’s goals were.
  • The records I found started in 1735, with the record of an unnamed enslaved person who was owned by one Paul Burtus. In most of these records, only the enslavers names are listed.
  • So I wanted to talk about some of the families I’ve discussed who were enslavers.
    • First up, we’ve got a 1790 record of Abigail Alsop, who owned 8 humans. It sounds like the household was made up of 10 non-enslaved people and 8 enslaved people, though it’s unclear to me how many, if any, of the non-enslaved people may have been household servants rather than enslavers.
    • In the 1810 census, John Alsop is listed as owning 4 enslaved people.
      • You may recognize the Alsop name from the episodes about Calvary Cemetery, because the family once had a farm where Calvary Cemetery stands today. And their family cemetery is actually inside Calvary Cemetery. I actually found it a month or so ago–it’s a weird little family cemetery tucked into a chain link fence in the middle of the separate, larger, Catholic Calvary Cemetery. From what I could tell, the headstones in the cemetery only marked the graves of the slave owning family members. I’m not sure where the enslaved people in the household were buried.
    • In the 1810 census, there’s an entry for Cornelious Berrien, who owned 4 enslaved people.
      • I’ve talked about the Berrien family cemeteries, which have been demolished, and then the Berriens also had an island named after them, which is now connected to the mainland and the site of a Con Edison power plant.
    • In 1810, there’s a record of two Blackwell households, enslaving one person per household.
      • You’ll recognize the Blackwells from many episodes–the used to own Blackwell’s Island, now called Roosevelt Island, the former site of the NY Lunatic Asylum, and the current site of the ruins of the old Renwick Smallpox Hospital.
    • Next up, there’s the Hallet family.
      • I couldn’t find the numbers from the early 1700s, when Elizabeth Hallet was supposedly killed, but I found some later census numbers.
      • The 1790 census shows 7 Hallet households, owning between one and 8 enslaved people each, for a total of 21 people who were enslaved by the Hallets of Newtown, Queens.
      • In 1810, there was one Hallett household listed, which enslaved 2 people.
      • You’ll recognize the Hallet family from Hallet’s Cove and Hallet’s Point, which I’ve mentioned many times.
    • Now we’ve got the Lawrence family, of Sarah Lawerence fame. I talked about their family cemetery, which still stands near the north shore of Astoria.
      • According to the 1790 census, their households housed between 1-9 enslaved people each.
      • In 1810, there were 3 Lawrence households, each enslaving between 2-4 people.
    • Now we’ve got the Moore family, who enslaved between 1-8 people per household in 1790.
      • In 1810, there were 6 Moore households, each enslaving between 1-6 people.
      • I talked about the Moore family in the Moore-Jackson Cemetery episode.
    • Next up is the Rapelje family, who I’ve mentioned in a bunch of my episodes focused on local history. The Rapeljes enslaved between 1-7 people per household in 1790.
      • In 1810, there were 7 Rapelye households, each enslaving 1-5 people
  • Then there’s the Riker family. I talked about them in the Riker-Lent-Smith cemetery episodes. In 1790, Jacobus Rycker owned 7 enslaved people.
    • In 1810, there were two Riker households, one which enslaved 3 people, and one which enslaved 5 people.
    • Sidenote, there was also a 1790 entry for a enslaving Lint, though the name was spelled differently, so not sure if it was the same Lent or not. However, in 1810, there’s a correctly spelled entry for a Lent household that enslaved 3 people.

Sources consulted RE: Ghosts of Astoria

Books RE: Ghosts of Astoria

Articles RE: Ghosts of Astoria

  • Brooklyn Times Union Sat Sep 4 1869
  • Another Haunted House in Astoria. Evening Post (published as The Evening Post.) (New York, New York)November 23, 1858
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Sun Jul 18 1886
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Wed Dec 27 1893
  • Brooklyn Times Union Sat Mar 7 1925
  • Brooklyn Times Union Thu Nov 22 1934
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Sun Jul 11 1937
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Thu Nov 22 1934
  • The Courier Fri Feb 2 1900
  • Image 18 of The sun (New York [N.Y.]), January 14, 1900
    Evening Post published as The Evening Post. November 23 1858
  • New York Tribune published as New-York Tribune. November 23 1858
  • Brooklyn Times Union Mon Oct 25 1909
  • The New York herald (New York, N.Y.), February 13, 1921, (SECTION 6)
  • Brooklyn Times Union Thu Jun 28 1888
  • GOLD GHOST WALKS IN ASTORIA HOUSE: Psychic Expert, Called to Old … New York Times (1923-Current file); Nov 21, 1934; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times with Index pg. 2 
  • POLICEMEN’S QUEST FOR GHOSTS FUTILE: Three Carloads Go to Astoria’s … New York Times (1923-Current file); Nov 22, 1934; ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times with Index pg. 1
  • The evening world (New York, N.Y.), December 30, 1889, (EXTRA 2 O’CLOCK)
  • The Appeal Sat Feb 24 1900
  • The Inter Ocean Sun Jan 21 1900
  • The Evening World Wed Nov 29 1893
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Thu Apr 19 1928
  • The Tonganoxie Mirror Thu Jul 19 1883
  • Reading Times Mon Jan 20 1896 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Sun Nov 8 1885 (1)
  • The evening world (New York, N.Y.), December 30, 1889, (EXTRA 2 O’CLOCK) https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030193/1889-12-30/ed-1/?sp=3&q=astoria+ghost&r=-0.026,0.482,0.453,0.19,0
  • The times (Washington [D.C.]), December 19, 1897: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn85054468/1897-12-19/ed-1/?sp=8&q=astoria+ghost&r=0.109,0.598,0.884,0.371,0
  • Image 18 of The sun (New York [N.Y.]), January 14, 1900: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030272/1900-01-14/ed-1/?sp=18&q=astoria+ghost&r=0.489,0.945,0.683,0.365,0
  • Image 8 of New-York tribune (New York [N.Y.]), January 7, 1919: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030214/1919-01-07/ed-1/?sp=8&q=astoria+sanatorium&r=0.385,0.216,0.487,0.205,0
  • Image 7 of The sun (New York [N.Y.]), February 17, 1919: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030431/1919-02-17/ed-1/?sp=7&q=astoria+sanatorium&r=0.569,0.553,0.276,0.116,0
  • Image 10 of New-York tribune (New York [N.Y.]), February 10, 1906: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030214/1906-02-10/ed-1/?sp=10&q=astoria+sanatorium&r=0.719,0.853,0.417,0.223,0
  • Image 4 of New-York tribune (New York [N.Y.]), September 30, 1905
  • Image 21 of The New York herald (New York, N.Y.), May 27, 1921: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83045774/1921-05-27/ed-1/?sp=21&q=astoria+sanatorium&r=0.342,0.678,0.311,0.166,0
  • Image 16 of New-York tribune (New York [N.Y.]), October 5, 1904: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030214/1904-10-05/ed-1/?sp=16&q=astoria+sanatorium&r=0.323,1.204,0.323,0.173,0
  • Brooklyn Times Union (Brooklyn, New York) · Thu, Nov 22, 1934 · Page 8: https://bplonsite.newspapers.com/image/576215460
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) · Sun, Jul 11, 1937 · Page 8: https://bplonsite.newspapers.com/image/52695146
  • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) · Thu, Nov 22, 1934 · Page 24: https://bplonsite.newspapers.com/image/59991092
  • https://www.qgazette.com/articles/pages-from-the-long-island-star-journal-9/
  • Image 18 of The sun (New York [N.Y.]), January 14, 1900: https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030272/1900-01-14/ed-1/?sp=18&q=astoria+ghost&r=0.555,0.033,0.321,0.148,0
  • Buffalo Morning Express and Illustrated Buffalo Express Tue Nov 13 1894

     

Websites

  • Records of enslaved people in Newtown, Queens: https://nyslavery.commons.gc.cuny.edu/search/?appSession=5MCUK448ECO579156B8UL5N69FD4FP9HR01OXX509Z67L48DL4CAXL8EEI52U669I1O38XF12FE61JXWM4Y10N2Z9JAN9LHJU8BN2285018P4549838QC2RQ2L4EH2QX
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_A._Garfield#Assassination
  • http://collections.mnhs.org/MNHistoryMagazine/articles/33/v33i01p029-034.pdf
  • https://kellykazek.com/2018/06/25/bet-you-didnt-know-about-this-haunted-american-castle/
  • https://time.com/96533/thieves-break-into-james-a-garfields-tomb/
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emanuel_Swedenborg
  • https://newtownpentacle.com/2009/06/13/a-big-dig-in-queens/
  • https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/who-really-ran-the-underground-railroad/
  • https://www.6sqft.com/15-underground-railroad-stops-in-new-york-city/
  • https://nyslavery.commons.gc.cuny.edu/
  • https://nyslavery.commons.gc.cuny.edu/search/?appSession=1WXJ2370QHI6H9C815459UHS4F9AVG7ZNZ5RH7T39B21KWP081R95709VQVLNQPWX8M9A7IO8M3W22FY550M360BW077FZ21H52A90IQ93SZZS0A870A6XT8EJ4V78I8
  • https://www.6sqft.com/search-over-35000-records-of-slavery-in-new-york/
  • https://www.6sqft.com/before-nycs-slave-market-freedmen-from-africa-were-allowed-to-own-farmland/
  • https://www.6sqft.com/in-the-1700s-there-was-an-official-location-for-buying-selling-and-renting-slaves-on-wall-street/
  • https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5e/1873_Beers_Map_of_Astoria,_Queens,_New_York_City_-_Geographicus_-_Astoria-beers-1873.jpg
  • https://oana-ny.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/old_astoria_map_1873_bg-1024×666.jpg
  • https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1873_Beers_Map_of_Astoria,_Queens,_New_York_City_-_Geographicus_-_Astoria-beers-1873.jpg
  • https://shop.old-maps.com/new-york/towns/kings-queens-cos-ny-1859-town/astoria-new-york-1859-old-town-map-custom-print-queens-co/
  • https://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/n-zfvgw8/wkatj7/products/109812/images/126869/LongIslandCity_Astoria_MiddleVillage_1873_web__84173.1548088614.1280.1280.jpg?c=2
  • https://www.mapsofantiquity.com/store/Antique_Maps_-_United_States/Northeast/New_York/Long_Island/Astoria,_New_York,_verso_Woodside,_Maspeth,_East_Williamsburg,_Newtown/inventory.pl?id=NYO016
  • https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/medny/astoria.jpg
  • https://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/medny/halsall7.asp
  • https://forgotten-ny.com/2002/02/astoria-necrology/
  • https://forgotten-ny.com/2002/02/astoria-necology-continued/
  • https://cdn6.picryl.com/photo/1903/12/31/queens-vol-2-double-page-plate-no-30-part-of-ward-two-newtown-trains-meadow-6c7e10-1600.jpg
  • https://www.qchron.com/qboro/stories/you-ain-t-afraid-of-no-ghost-we-ll-see-about-that/article_010ee09d-001f-5505-a643-147da790ecbf.html

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